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Monday, April 6, 2009

How to cook a hard-boiled egg

It's recently come to my attention that a lot of people don't know how to make a decent hard-boiled egg. Forget perfect, I'm concerend that one learn how to cook the eggs correctly, we'll worry about perfect another time. Besides, perfect is so over-rated. One of the assistant teachers at the preschool where I work was about to add a cold raw egg in its shell to a pot of already cooked-about to become hockey pucks-eggs. All I could see was exploding green eggs all over the kitchen. While I told her what to do, I realized that she and a lot of other people had no idea how easy it can be to make a good hard boiled egg; it's also so easy to make them badly too. So herewith is today's lesson. I promise it will work and you will no longer have a green ring, grey yolk, or rubbery eggs for your next Easter Egg hunt.

Equipment and Ingredients to make 6 Hard Boiled Eggs
  1. A 3 or 4 Quart Sauce Pot with a tight fitting lid
  2. Cold Water from the faucet
  3. 6 Large Fresh Eggs - white, brown or Martha Stewart pretty coloured shells, it makes NO DIFFERENCE!
  4. Pinch of Salt - Kosher is best but any table salt will do
  5. Heat - from the stove, gas, electric, or shudder, those invection glass top monstrosities
Directions:
  1. Carefully put the eggs in the sauce pot and add enough cold tap water to cover the eggs by one inch above their shells.
  2. Put a pinch of salt into the pot. This is in case the eggs crack, it will help keep the egg white from spewing out. It also increases the water's boiling time and boiling point.
  3. Put the lid on the pot.
  4. Turn the heat up to medium-high. Bring the water to a rapid boil. Don't walk out of the kitchen or go too far away, you need to be aware of when the water begins to boil rapidly.
  5. Once the water has come to a rapid boil - where big bubbles are forming and there is a lot of steam and noise because the eggs are jostling around in the pot, TURN THE HEAT OFF!
  6. Remove the pot from the hot burner and place it on another burner that is off and cool. Keep the lid on the pot and let the eggs sit in the hot water for 10 to 12 minutes, depending on the size of the eggs. USE A TIMER! Medium to large eggs, 10 minutes; extra large to jumbo up to 12 minutes. Double yolk eggs - what, you got money to burn, forgetaboutit! Don't use 'em for hard boiled eggs!
  7. After the timer has dinged, carefully pour the hot water out of the pot and start to run cold tap water over the eggs. If you have any ice sticks or ice packs in the freezer, carefully toss one or two into the pot with the eggs to help cool them down. Chill the eggs under cold water for about 5 minutes. Remove the eggs from the cold water, they should now be cool enough to handle. Refrigerate immediately, separating them from uncooked eggs or marking them with a pencil, distinctly so you know which eggs are raw and which are cooked, unless you want to spin the eggs, in which case you should know that a hard boiled egg will spin on it's end like a top and a raw egg will just weeble over and wobble.

2 comments:

  1. In your artical on boiling an egg,step 6, it should read "hot water" not cold water. right???

    Remove the pot from the hot burner and place it on another burner that is off and cool. Keep the lid on the pot and let the eggs sit in the cold water for 10 to 12 minutes, depending on the size of the eggs. USE A TIMER! Medium to large eggs, 10 minutes; extra large to jumbo up to 12 minutes. Double yolk eggs - what, you got money to burn, forgetaboutit! Don't use 'em for hard boiled eggs!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Martin - Thanks! What an over-sight. Indeed you are correct - the eggs need to sit in the pot of hot water for 10 to 12 minutes then they get cooled off. Thanks for catching that!

    ReplyDelete

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